Saturday, 6 December 2014

Reports of an Alien Autopsy at Roswell

Reports of an Alien Autopsy at Roswell

One part of Corso’s story was immediately tied into what appears now to have been a carefully constructed hoax, but at the time was thought to be possible final proof of the Roswell UFO Crash. Corso said that he read a report that detailed an autopsy carried out on one of the aliens that had died in the crashed saucer at Roswell. Corso gave a lot of detail that he remembered from this report. He said that the bones were fibrous in structure, not cellular like most bones of terrestrial creatures. The lungs and heart showed signs of having been bioengineered, presumably so that they could withstand the rigours of interstellar travel. The musculature indicated that the being came from a planet with a lower gravitational pull than Earth, so it was thought that it would have had difficulty moving on Earth.

According to Corso the report said that two of the aliens had survived the crash. One had tried to flee the crash scene and had been shot by a military guard. The second had been injured in the crash and died a few months later. One doctor suspected that Earth’s atmosphere while not actually toxic to the aliens, did not fully agree with their physiology.

This reference to an autopsy was quickly linked to what was claimed to be a few minutes of movie footage that showed the autopsy taking place. The reports began circulating even before Corso’s book hit the bookshops. According to Ray Santilli, a British film producer, he had been approached by a retired cameraman who had worked for the US military in the 1940s and 1950s. This cameraman claimed to have kept some footage of top secret projects on which he had worked, and now wanted to sell them. He said he wanted to buy a wedding present for his granddaughter.

Santilli said that at first he was doubtful if the footage would have any great commercial value given that projects classified as highly secret in 1950 would probably be declassified by 1995. The footage might, he thought, have some use to companies making history documentaries, so he agreed to view it. He was amazed when one section showed what appeared to be an autopsy of an alien humanoid. The cameraman said that he had shot that sequence in 1947 at a USAAF base in Fort Worth, Texas.

from "Roswell" by Rupert Matthews
Get your copy HERE




http://www.amazon.co.uk/Roswell-Rupert-Matthews/dp/1848373627/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1417853463&sr=1-1&keywords=roswell%22+by+Rupert+Matthews


Thursday, 4 December 2014

A Ghost Sighting at the Sun Inn, just north of Houghton le Spring

A Ghost Sighting at the Sun Inn, just north of Houghton le Spring

Take, for instance, the haunting of the Sun Inn, just north of Houghton le Spring. The ghost here is of a middle aged man, but he has no story to explain him. An account of the ghost was given to me by Neil, the chef at the pub.

“Oh right. Well, I’ve seen him a few times, see. But got my best look last winter. My washer and me were in here early in the morning doing our prep – you know getting the vegetables sliced and everything ready for quick cooking. Got to be freshly cooked to taste right, see.

“Anyhow, we were all alone in the pub and working away when the ghost walks along that corridor out there, past the kitchen door that was open. He was an oldish fellah, I think, and wearing a dark jacket. But you’d know him if you saw him. My mate looks up and says ‘Did you see that? Who was that?’ I told him it was just the ghost, but he wouldn’t have it. He insisted it was a real person walking around. So we went out into the corridor, but as you can see there is just that door at the end that opens out into the car park at the rear. There was nobody in the corridor, of course, so we open the door and look in the car park. Nobody there. And because it had snowed the night before we could see there were no footprints either. No one had walked out that door and that’s a fact.” Neil chuckled. “My mate’s face was a picture. I reckon he believes in ghosts now alright.”

Tuesday, 2 December 2014

A Word about Poltergeists

A Word about Poltergeists

The word “poltergeist” is German for “noisy ghost”, but that does not even begin to describe the range of activities that these entities get up to - nor the sheer terror that they can inspire. When the director of a horror movie is looking for ghostly events with which to scare his audience, it is to the poltergeist that he turns. Their ability to scare, terrify and persecute is endless and their tricky malevolence beyond dispute.

Poltergeists have gone by various names in the past. They have been thought to be a wicked tribe of fairies, being called boggles or boggarts. Others have thought they are demons from hell, or familiar spirits sent by witches and wizards to wreak havoc. These days the disturbances are subjected to more scientific enquiry and more rational explanations sought - though not always with any real success.

Poltergeists come in many forms and their activities can be astonishingly diverse. What links al the cases is that unseen hands move objects, create noises and generally make a nuisance of themselves in a particular house or place of work. Some poltergeists content themselves with childish pranks, others indulge in the full panoply of terror.

from "Paranormal Surrey" by Rupert Matthews.
Get your copy HERE
http://www.amazon.co.uk/Paranormal-Surrey-Rupert-Matthews/dp/0752454226/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1417512381&sr=1-1&keywords=Paranormal+Surrey%22+by+Rupert+Matthews

Saturday, 29 November 2014

The Mournful Bell of Coquet Dale

The Mournful Bell of Coquet Dale


One such story concerns Brinkburn Priory, lying secluded in a deep ravine inside a loop of the River Coquet in Northumberland. Apparently an army of Scottish raiders was plundering its way down Coquet Dale, setting fire to villages and farms as it went. The monks knew that their holy vocation would not save them from the attentions of the Scots, for gold and silver from crosses and reliquaries was as valuable as that from any other source. And the Scots had no fear of divine retribution nor respect for the God’s property. The monks hid fearfully in their hidden valley, hoping that the passing raiders would leave them alone.

One by one new columns of smoke rose into the air, marking the villages that the Scots passed through. The monks could track the path of the plunderers by watching the sky. Then the villages further away began to go up in flames, while the smoke from those closer to hand faded away as the flames died down. The Scots had passed on.

The prior fell to his knees in grateful prayer and ordered his brethren to prepare to celebrate a mass of thanksgiving to God for their escape. As monks filed into the church one younger brother who was less worldly than the others ran to ring the great bell that customarily marked the beginning of a service at Brinkburn. He pulled on the rope and the bell sounded out.

A mile away a straggling group of Scots scouts, heard the bell tolling. They realised that it could mean only that some village or settlement had escaped the attentions of their fellow raiders. Determined not to miss out on this chance, the invaders spurred their horses toward the sound of the bell.

Back at Brinkburn, the prior dragged the monk from the bell rope and silenced the ringing, but it was too late. The Scots were galloping down the lane that led to the priory. In desperation the monks fled, swimming the waters of the Coquet to escape. Behind them the Scots plundered the priory, torched the buildings and went on their way with their loot.

What happened to the fateful bell is something of a mystery. Some say that the fire set by the Scots burned through the timbers holding the bell in the tower and sent it crashing to the ground to roll into the Coquet. Another version states that when the monks returned, they themselves threw the bell into the river to punish it for having betrayed them to the enemy. Yet another tale says that the monks put the bell in to the river to save it from any future marauders. In all versions, the fateful bell ended up in the Coquet and there, it is said, it remains to this day. The legend says that it will toll mournfully from the depths when disaster is at hand.

from "Mysterious Northumberland" by Rupert Matthews.
Get your copy HERE




http://www.amazon.co.uk/Mysterious-Northumberland-Rupert-Matthews/dp/1780913079/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1417250979&sr=1-1&keywords=Mysterious+Northumberland%22+by+Rupert+Matthews